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GQR Corporate Perspective

Why Qualitative Thinking Matters

Why Qualitative Thinking Matters

The paradox is that whilst we hone in on the role of metrics, many of the answers to our clients’ thorniest dilemmas lie in smart qualitative insight.

Anger Management

Anger Management

Activism is on the rise. Technology can turn consumers into campaigners at the click of a button. How should business leaders respond? Graeme Trayner reports.

Why Changing Opinions Is Hard and What Can Be Done

Why Changing Opinions Is Hard and What Can Be Done

Communicators and marketers aim to change public attitudes every day. But bringing about that change can be frustrating and challenging. As people, we can be stubborn when it comes to our opinions and are reluctant to change our views, let alone how we act and behave. Yet, the situation is not all bleak for those tasked with persuasion, as the big, and rapid, public shifts on social issues such as marriage equality have shown. What do we need to know about how attitudes are formed, and how they might evolve?

Why We're Learning Even If We're Not Paying Attention...

Why We're Learning Even If We're Not Paying Attention...

Every day, we each encounter 3,000 messages from brands, businesses and organizations. In this environment, it is hard to fathom how any one perspective sticks with us or how an individual or institution can get its case across. But, the area of “low-involvement thinking" sheds light on how we form attitudes about topics and issues even if we are not fully engaged, and how brands and reputations evolve and change.

Leadership in Politics and Business: Shared Challenges

Leadership in Politics and Business: Shared Challenges

Being a political leader in a democracy is an inherently tenuous role – elections are won or lost, mandates secured or whittled away. In business, leadership has required an ongoing effort to maintain support; but in recent decades, CEOs have started to experience a similar level of volatility that their political counterparts have long faced. Between 2000 and 2010, the average tenure of a Fortune 500 CEO fell from 9.5 years to 3.5 years – a period of time almost mirroring a single American presidential term. In 2011, nearly 15% of the world’s top CEOs left their jobs, with the turnover rate being highest among the 250 largest companies.