New USC Annenberg - Los Angeles Times Poll on Politics and the Press


On behalf of the University of Southern California Annenberg School and the Los Angeles Times, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, in conjunction with American Viewpoint, conducted a new national survey among 1,009 registered voters on politics and the press. This survey shows:

  • Obama has slight lead over Romney in new nationwide poll
  • Voters still tuned in to traditional news media,  local television news rules with voters

Key Findings

USC-LAT Full Frequency Questionnaire (PDF - 35 K)

USC-LAT Full Crosstabs (PDF - 28 K)

Even with increasingly more and diverse ways to access news, voters still turn primarily to traditional and local sources, according to the new University of Southern California Annenberg-Los Angeles Times Poll on Politics and the Press, conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner and American Viewpoint.

The survey provides a new look at the intersection of politics and media consumption, examining not only the way voters get their news and what sources they trust, but how that impacts political behavior and what it can mean in this election. For instance, the survey confirms that, with the exception of Fox News and conservative talk radio, Democratic voters are more trusting of the vast majority of news media sources than are Republicans. As a result, they tend to consume more news, and the more media one consumes, the more likely they are to vote for President Obama.

Additional key findings include:

  • One-quarter of voters say they now get news from Facebook every day—as much or more than the major cable news networks.
  • Young people use more non-traditional sources like Facebook or news aggregators to consume media than older people, unsurprisingly, but they have not abandoned traditional sources as they still often use sources like the local TV news and newspapers.
  • Republicans seem to have more consolidated news consumption habits than Democrats -- they put most of their trust in Fox News, while viewing CNN as just as liberal as MSNBC. Democrats’ views are more diffuse – they give Fox News higher favorability ratings than Republicans give MSNBC.
  • Overall, just days before the conventions begin, President Obama leads Romney 49 to 46 among registered voters, driven largely by the favorability gap – in which Obama is a net 11 points more favorable than Romney.

Articles

Below you can find articles and stories on findings of this poll:

August 23

Obama has slight lead over Romney in new nationwide poll -- Los Angeles Times

National USC-Annenberg - Los Angeles Times poll shows presidential race in dead heat going into conventions -- USC Annenberg

August 24

Voters still tuned in to traditional news media, poll finds -- Los Angeles Times

National USC-Annenberg - Los Angeles Times Poll shows local television news rules with voters -- USC Annenberg

Methodology

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, in conjunction with American Viewpoint, conducted this USC Annenberg - Los Angeles Times Poll on Politics and the Press.

These findings are based on a random sample survey of 1,009 national registered voters, conducted from August 13th to 19th, 2012. Interviews were conducted by telephone using live interviewers.  Respondents were reached on a landline or cell phone using a random digit dialing (RDD) process.  Twenty percent of this sample was reached on a cell phone.  Up to five attempts were made to reach and interview each voter.  In order to examine distinctions and include a wider range of questions in this study, some questions were split into random half-samples.

Upon completion of all interviewing, the data were weighted to reflect the total population of registered voters throughout the nation, balancing on regional and demographic characteristics for gender, age, race, and party registration according to known census estimates and voter file projections.

The maximum sampling error for the overall sample of 1,009 registered voters is +/- 3.1 percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.  Margin of error for subgroups is higher.  The margin of error for the 954 likely voters is +/- 3.2 percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.