Support for Equality in Nebraska


nebraskaequality

A recent survey of 616 adults in Nebraska shows broad support for expanding legal protections for the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community in this deeply conservative state. On questions ranging from employment discrimination, to adoption, to anti-bullying legislation, to establishing domestic partnerships for same-sex couples, impressive majorities of Nebraska residents are committed to changing laws to increase equality for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people across the state. Indeed, the state is well ahead of Nebraska politicians on these issues.

But even more impressive is the growing social equality of the LGBT community. At one time, this community was defined by media-driven stereotypes. It is now defined by gay neighbors, gay co-workers, gay friends, and gay relatives. A 60 percent majority of the state know at least one gay or lesbian person. Not only do huge majorities of Nebraska residents believe they could be close friends with a gay man or lesbian, but a majority would not be bothered if one of their children or grandchildren turned out to be gay. 

As is the case with the rest of the country, Nebraska has not fully embraced the equality of the LGBT community. There is still work to do. A majority oppose marriage equality in this state and reactions to gay and lesbian people in general are mixed. But the state, like the country, has changed.

This memorandum summarizes the results of a survey of 616 Nebraska adults taken between August 2 and 4, 2011 with an oversample of 200 adults in the city of Omaha. The total sample in the city of Omaha stands at 300 counting both the base sample and oversample. The survey was commissioned by the Human Rights Campaign, Citizens for Equal Protection (CFEP) and executed by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research. It carries on margin of error of +/- 4.00 at a 95 percent confidence level.

Key Findings

  • Nebraska residents strongly support basic civil rights protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
  • Nebraska is in a different place when it comes to marriage equality.
  • Legal equality springs from the growing social equality in the state.

Full memo

Frequency questionnaire

Methodology

This memorandum summarizes the results of a survey of 616 Nebraska adults taken between August 2 and 4, 2011 with an oversample of 200 adults in the city of Omaha. The total sample in the city of Omaha stands at 300 counting both the base sample and oversample. The survey was commissioned by the Human Rights Campaign, CFEP and executed by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research. It carries on margin of error of +/- 4.00 at a 95 percent confidence level.


Source: Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research

Clients: The Human Rights Campaign and Citizens for Equal Protection (CFEP)